- Lea's Blog

 

Learning is and must be an essential part of a society and surely must be a key aspect of Europe’s activities in the future. The Latvian Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the Latvian National Library in Riga, Latvia organise a key event with invited key players in the fields of digital skills, trust and confidence, creative content, ensuring access and connectivity, building the digital economy for businesses and consumers, promoting e-society, and digitising European industries and entreprises. The event will be held on June 17 and 18, 2015. Lea’s Box is invited to this event to give the perspective of human learning a profound voice. Intersted people may follow the event via live stream! Check it  out: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/digital-assembly-2015

 

Lea in the Box
05/21/15

Open EdX - makes cool online courses

 

Dear fellows and followers of Lea,

 

This time I want to introduce the Open EdX initiative. EdX is a nonprofit online initiative created by founding partners Harvard and MIT and composed of various organisations, the xConsortium. EdX offers interactive online courses and MOOCs from the world’s best universities and institutions. Open edX is the open source platform that powers edX courses.  Institutions can host their own instances and offer their own classes. Educators can extend the platform to build learning tools that precisely meet their needs. Check it out!

https://www.edx.org/

https://open.edx.org/

 

 

Die FH JOANNEUM veranstaltet den 14. E-Learning Tag am Mittwoch, dem 16.9.2015 in  Graz. Thematisch befasst sich der Tag mit der Vielfalt der Lernräume“ mit  einen Einblick in den Einsatz didaktischer Szenarien sowie Erfahrungen in der Schule“ mit Fokus auf dem Einsatz von Smartphones, um Individualisierung im Unterricht, Flipped Classrooms und interaktive Lernmaterialien.

 

Mehr Infos: http://www.fh-joanneum.at/aw/home/leitbild/organisation/Zentrale_Services/zml/News_Events/zml_news/~cxes/Programm-ELT-2015/?lan=de

 


 

Ali Türker
05/21/15

Machine vs Toolbox Approach

 

No educational system is better than its teachers. OECD is one of the largest data collecting and analysing institutions in the World. In a conference titled “EDUCATION GOVERNANCE: THE ROLE OF DATA” held by OECD where EU ministries of education participated, one of the conclusion were “Anything more complex than Excell may not be taken up.”

The summary of the meeting reports that a lively discussion was had around issues regarding capacity of schools, teachers, and even researchers to use these analytics. Not only time pressure but also habbit or even skill formation was regarded to be a critical factor in using analytics for educational decision making. Even though "research based practice" is a well-studied topic, a teacher who might choose the work in such regime needs an affective programme of training and support. Research techniques that utilize data, the care for privacy, having an eye for causality and other practical implementation issues are not commonly studied during pre-service training and not trivial for most teachers.


 

Ali

 

 

 

Date: 12-13 February 2015, Talinn

 

Mr Henno Theisens (The Hague School of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands) and Ms Tracey Burns (OECD/CERI) each led one of the two workshops on Learning Analytics. The lead-input in both sessions was provided by Mr Peter Karlberg (Swedish National Agency for Education, Sweden); with his presentation revolving around the EU-funded LACE project (Learning Analytics and Community Exchange).

 

This workshop presented the emerging field of learning analytics, variously described also as Data Analytics, Data Mining, and Big Data. As the field is developing there are a number of competing ideas about what would count as learning analytics, and this workshop took a very broad definition, which included such things as computer-based testing and use of evaluation and assessment data.

 

The EU project aims at the “measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimising learning and the environments in which it occurs.”. As the topic was new to many of the participants, the focus of the workshop rested on the detailed explanations of learning analytics in general and the LACE project in particular.

 

One of the outstanding questions was how likely it was that Learning Analytics and the use of big data would reach the classroom in a widespread manner. While the experts in the field feel that this would take between 3-5 years, the workshop participants were less convinced that change would come so quickly. In particular, there were a number of questions and issues revolving around privacy and the ethics of this practice, which seemed would take some time to resolve. What did become clear is that, in the absence of broader knowledge on the topic, there was room for potential exploitation of data and classrooms by researchers. While this could be a positive (new frontiers and methodologies for addressing difficult questions), it was also a potential negative if care was not taken to protect the rights and obtain informed consent from students and/or their parents. A lively discussion was also had around issues regarding capacity of schools, teachers, and even researchers to use these techniques, privacy, causality and practical implementation.

 

Ali Türker
05/21/15

Machine vs Toolbox Approach

 

No educational system is better than its teachers. OECD is one of the largest data collecting and analysing institutions in the World. In a conference titled “EDUCATION GOVERNANCE: THE ROLE OF DATA” held by OECD where EU ministries of education participated, one of the conclusion were “Anything more complex than Excell may not be taken up.”

The summary of the meeting reports that a lively discussion was had around issues regarding capacity of schools, teachers, and even researchers to use these analytics. Not only time pressure but also habbit or even skill formation was regarded to be a critical factor in using analytics for educational decision making. Even though "research based practice" is a well-studied topic, a teacher who might choose the work in such regime needs an affective programme of training and support. Research techniques that utilize data, the care for privacy, having an eye for causality and other practical implementation issues are not commonly studied during pre-service training and not trivial for most teachers.


 

Ali

 

 

 

Date: 12-13 February 2015, Talinn

 

Mr Henno Theisens (The Hague School of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands) and Ms Tracey Burns (OECD/CERI) each led one of the two workshops on Learning Analytics. The lead-input in both sessions was provided by Mr Peter Karlberg (Swedish National Agency for Education, Sweden); with his presentation revolving around the EU-funded LACE project (Learning Analytics and Community Exchange).

 

This workshop presented the emerging field of learning analytics, variously described also as Data Analytics, Data Mining, and Big Data. As the field is developing there are a number of competing ideas about what would count as learning analytics, and this workshop took a very broad definition, which included such things as computer-based testing and use of evaluation and assessment data.

 

The EU project aims at the “measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimising learning and the environments in which it occurs.”. As the topic was new to many of the participants, the focus of the workshop rested on the detailed explanations of learning analytics in general and the LACE project in particular.

 

One of the outstanding questions was how likely it was that Learning Analytics and the use of big data would reach the classroom in a widespread manner. While the experts in the field feel that this would take between 3-5 years, the workshop participants were less convinced that change would come so quickly. In particular, there were a number of questions and issues revolving around privacy and the ethics of this practice, which seemed would take some time to resolve. What did become clear is that, in the absence of broader knowledge on the topic, there was room for potential exploitation of data and classrooms by researchers. While this could be a positive (new frontiers and methodologies for addressing difficult questions), it was also a potential negative if care was not taken to protect the rights and obtain informed consent from students and/or their parents. A lively discussion was also had around issues regarding capacity of schools, teachers, and even researchers to use these techniques, privacy, causality and practical implementation.

 

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Lea's Learning Analytics Blog

Learning analytics, educational data mining, formative assessment - all recent buzz words in educational research. In principle, the idea is to find theoretical frameworks, models, procedures, and smart tools to collect, aggregate, analyze, reason on and visualize large scale educational data. LEA’s BOX is a research and development project funded by the European Commission. The project aims at (a) making educational assessment and appraisal more goal-oriented, proactive, and beneficial for students, and (b) at enabling formative support of teachers and other educational stakeholders on a solid basis of a wide range of information about learners. That means, LEA’s BOX is a learning analytics toolbox that is intended to enable educators to perform competence-centered, multi-source learning analytics. More info at http://www.leas-box.eu!

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